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Organisations who are Members of EFNCP

The European Forum on Nature Conservation and Pastoralism is a network of some 60 member organisations in more than 20 European countries. Our membership is very diverse, in terms of size (from local grassroots organisations to European federations), type of entity (not-for-profit organisations, companies, research centres, government agencies, etc.), scope of work and financial resources.

Given our shared concern for the future of farming systems with high nature conservation and cultural value in Europe, we share information and collaborate in specific projects, mostly related to semi-natural pastures, grazing-based livestock systems and policy work. You will find below short descriptions of our member organisations. For more information, please contact Jabier Ruiz, our Network Officer (jabier@efncp.org).

Bulgaria Lithuania Croatia Romania Hungary Slovakia Portugal Spain France Netherlands Ireland United Kingdom Italy Switzerland Germany Sweden Austria Belgium Serbia Macedonia Estonia Latvia Norway Isle of Man Finland Map Europe: Corporate Members of EFNCP

Regional

Butterfly Conservation Europe

Butterfly Conservation Europe (BC-Europe) is a not for profit organisation focused on halting and reversing the decline of butterflies, moths and their habitats. BCE has 45 partners in 36 countries, many doing active conservation work, butterfly monitoring and engaging with the public. BCE has identified Prime Butterfly Areas in Europe and works with colleagues in the European Habitats Forum to influence policy thinking, including on biodiversity strategy implementation, sustainable management of the Natura 2000 network and reform of the EU Common Agricultural Policy. BCE priorities include extending monitoring schemes and preventing extinctions of endemic and rare butterflies. You can read BCE’s Strategy and research findings on their website and follow their activities on Facebook and Twitter.

European Environmental Policy Advisor, Sue Collins (sue.collins@bc-europe.eu) points to the 30% decline in butterfly abundance since 1990: With partners in 21 countries we carry out butterfly monitoring in the field and compile the European Grassland Butterfly Indicator that shows this worrying trend. The sustainable grazing and mowing of HNV grassland that EFNCP supports is critical to maintaining populations of lepidoptera and the other invertebrates that provide valuable pollination services. An ecological reform of the CAP and more investment in biodiversity safeguard and recovery are urgently needed.


The Eurasian Dry Grassland Group (EDGG) is a Working Group of the International Association for Vegetation Science (IAVS). EDGG is a network of dry grassland researchers and conservationists, who aim to develop and advance research on any aspect (vegetation, flora, fauna, soils, etc.) of Palearctic natural and semi-natural grasslands (i.e., steppes, dry, mesic, wet, acidic, calcareous, rocky, saline, coastal and alpine grasslands). EDGG (a) promotes education, publication and appropriate application of research results, (b) supports policies and legislation towards protection and proper management, and (c) facilitates scientific and personal communication in this domain.



EDGG Executive Committee member Michael Vrahnakis (mvrahnak@teilar.gr) foresees close collaboration with EFNCP, including jointly organised events: the Forum can provide our network with updated information concerning EU and individual Member States’ policies for conservation of habitats and organisms, and on the impacts of these policies on social aspects and institutional arrangements, while EDGG can feed the Forum with expertise on the current status of scientific knowledge for Palearctic natural and semi-natural grasslands, such as best practices on grassland or species management.


European Centre for Nature Conservation

The European Centre for Nature Conservation (ECNC) is an NGO working for the conservation and sustainable use of Europe’s nature, biodiversity and landscapes. ECNC promotes an integrated approach for both land and sea management and actively stimulates the interaction between science, society and policy. Among other projects, ECNC manages the Natura 2000 Communication platform on behalf of the European Commision. ECNC publishes a newsletter, and you can also follow their activities on twitter.

Since its establishment in 1993 ECNC has developed a working partnership with an extensive network of organizations and institutes from all over Europe. Grasslands are not our core business, says Neil McIntosh (mcintosh@ecnc.org), Deputy Executive Director of ECNC, but it is a high priority for several of our network partners and is also an important subject in several of our projects, thus our interest of collaborating with the EFNCP.


Institute for European Environmental Policy

The Institute for European Environmental Policy (IEEP) is an independent not-for-profit research and consultancy organisation dedicated to advancing a more sustainable Europe through the development, implementation and evaluation of environmental and environment-related policies. IEEP works closely with the full range of policy actors from international agencies and the EU institutions to national government departments, NGOs, academics and the business world. You may follow IEEP on twitter.

IEEP Director David Baldock (dbaldock@ieep.eu) participated in EFNCP from the start, and collaborations have continued to-date. Most recently, we have worked together in analysing results-based agri-environment payment schemes (RBAPS) as a way to improve the approaches to biodiversity delivery on farmland in Europe.

Belgium

Natural Resources, Human Environment & Agronomy

Natural Resources, Human Environment & Agronomy (RHEA) is a scientific research centre specialized in rural development and ecosystem management. The RHEA team carries out research and consultancy projects in the fields of agriculture, biodiversity, agroecology and sustainable development.

In 2010, RHEA director Alain Peeters (alain.peeters@rhea-environment.org) participated in the High Nature Value grasslands conference organised by EFNCP in Sibiu (Romania), where he gave a talk and contributed to the position paper on HNV farming. He also coordinated the chapter on Belgium in the book High Nature Value farming in Europe and has facilitated EFNCP collaborations with the European Grassland Federation and the FAO/CIHEAM Network on Pasture and Fodder crops.

Bulgaria

Society for Territorial and Environmental Prosperity

The Society for Territorial and Environmental Prosperity (STEP, facebook) is an NGO working for sustainable territorial and environmental rural development through the conservation of natural resources and biodiversity, diversification of the rural economy, introduction of innovative practices and partnerships. The organization also aims to increase the knowledge and the capacity of local communities and farmers on nature-friendly practices and activities.

In 2015, STEP and EFNCP are implementing a project for sustainable management of HNV municipal grasslands in Bulgaria. According to STEP Chair Vyara Stefanova (viara_mail@dir.bg), the project seeks to establish a partnership between various actors – farmers, municipal authorities, local action group, environmental NGOs and research institutions and to find joint solutions for the sustainable management of grasslands in a Natura 2000 area.

Croatia

The Ecological Society of Brod (BED) is a Conservation NGO founded in 1989, one of the oldest in Croatia. The largest visible success of BED is the programme of protection and improvement of common protected pasture Gajna. BED is present there not only as an environmental NGO but also as a co-manager: they support the local community, initiated a Pasturing community-cooperative and they also raise several endangered indigenous livestock breeds. You can follow BED activities on facebook.

BED educates and promotes values of landscape and biodiversity conservation, environment and nature protection, and preservation of traditional and cultural heritage. We also work on issues related to Natura 2000 areas, the development of civil society and sustainable development and, very much in line with EFNCP, on sustainable agricultural practices connected with nature conservation and the issue of common governance of natural resources, says Programme Coordinator Iris Beneš (iris@bed.hr)

Estonia

The aim of the Estonian Fund for Nature (ELF) is to preserve Estonian nature and its diversity. Since 1991, this voluntary civic association has cooperated with many people and organizations in various wildlife conservation projects. On the initiative of ELF, protected areas have been established and extensive inventories to map Estonia’s natural resources have been carried out. You can follow ELF activities on facebook and see their videos on youtube.

According to ELF expert Aleksei Lotman (alexlotman@gmail.com), ELF is engaged in sustainable rural development and HNV agriculture, including semi-natural habitat management, so it is natural for us to partner with EFNCP as the key Pan-European network dealing with these issues.

Finland

Baltic Sea Action Group

The Baltic Sea Action Group (BSAG) is an independent private foundation, established in 2008 and based in Helsinki. BSAG works to restore the good ecological balance of the Baltic Sea, largely by enhancing nutrient recycling on the whole food system. BSAG and The Nature and Game Management Trust Finland, started in 2009 the project JÄRKI (Järki = Sense in English) to promote sensible measures of biodiversity, water protection and climate change adaptation in agriculture and forestry. The project focuses on three methods: farm advice, communication and development.

Sustainable grazing is one key element in the project, says Eija Hagelberg, director of the JÄRKI project, who has been working with biodiversity, grazing issues and farm advisory for many years in Finland. By joining the EFNCP network, we would like to co-operate with European colleagues in order to make it easier for farmers and other stakeholders to maintain biodiversity and cultural heritage all over Europe.

France

The Conservatoire d'espaces naturels Provence-Alpes-Côte d'Azur (CEN PACA) is a non-profit association that has been working to preserve the natural heritage of the PACA region in southeastern France for over 40 years. CEN PACA has almost 50 full-time staff, protects and manages 93 natural sites, leads several Life projects, and organises numerous hikes and nature-tourism activities for the general public in the region. You can follow their activities on facebook.

Axel Wolff (axel.wolff@cen-paca.org), head of the CEN PACA Bouches-du-Rhône area office, is also the coordinator of the Crau nature reserve, which they manage together with the Chambre d'agriculture, a farmers organisation: We fully share EFNCP’s view that pastoral activities and constraints must be integrated in conservation schemes, and we have made it a priority goal of the Crau reserve since we started our collaborative management with farmers in 2004.

Germany

Landcare Germany (Deutscher Verband für Landschaftspflege - DVL) is the umbrella organisation of 155 Landcare Associations (LCAs). Their core element is the cooperative way of work, which is based on the consensus and mutual trust of nature conservationists, land users and local authorities to protect and develop cultural landscapes in Germany. This is achieved by the right of each group to send equal numbers of representatives to the boards of LCAs, so no group can overpower the others. LCAs act as advisers, they plan measures to improve the ecological value of the man-made landscapes, open up financial resources and coordinate their implementation. DVL also runs training courses, produces an informative magazine and fosters exchanges among its members.

Since 1993, DVL has participated in discussions on the Common Agricultural Policy (CAP), and is also concerned by the application of the European Environmental Policy in Germany, hence their collaborations with EFNCP on semi-natural grasslands and the CAP. According to DVL Deputy Chief Executive Officer Bernd Blümlein (bluemlein@lpv.de), these policies have a big influence on the practical work done by LCAs, so we strive to keep our members informed and trained. The implementation of these policies differs across German Federal States, resulting in a wide range of experiences which can be very interesting to other European partners. You can follow DVL news and activities on Facebook, and see their videos on Youtube.

Hungary

Pro Vértes

Initially, the main goal of Pro Vértes (website, facebook) was to solve the nature protection and cultural heritage problems arising from the legal gaps and the privatisation that inevitably came along with the change in the regime of the country in 1990. As a result of their successful and even more secured activities, they widened the scope of their activities with the ongoing following programmes: nature protection management; nature-friendly land management; education and awareness-raising; protection of historical buildings; eco-tourism; and operation of the Vértes Nature Park. Pro Vértes also coordinates the Hungarian Network of the Public Foundation for Nature Conservation.

Levente Viszló (provertes@provertes.hu), Leader of Pro Vértes, believes that being part of EFNCP is an excellent way of meeting other organisations involved in pastoralism: We can exchange information and share the experience we have gained after 20 years managing protected areas with extensively kept native livestock. Currently, we are facing an absolutely new situation: undergrazing has become one of the most important nature conservation problems in Hungary and neighbouring countries. Solutions applied elsewhere for this challenge will be most useful for our national network and our partners in the region.

Ireland

The Burrenbeo Trust is a registered membership charity dedicated to the sustainable conservation and development of the Burren region, a High Nature Value farming landscape along Ireland’s mid western coast. Burrenbeo has over 40 different programmes including a wide range of education, information provision, research and active conservation projects. As Burren farmers are the key actors in the conservation of the of the Burren, much of Burrenbeo’s work focusses on this group. Such work includes detailed education programmes in local schools, festivals to celebrate farming traditions (such as the Winterage Weekend) as well as monthly walks and talks for the local community.

Burrenbeo works with the EFNCP in promoting awareness of the important role played by farmers in supporting heritage, in advocating for greater support for HNV farmers, hosting HNV farmer study groups and organising events such as the annual Winterage School on sustainable farming. Brendan Dunford, secretary of the Burrenbeo Trust, is also a Director of EFNCP. Burrenbeo has a staff of three people (trust@burrenbeo.com), based in Kinvara, Co. Galway. For more information, you may want to follow Burrenbeo on facebook, twitter and youtube.

Italy

The Department of Nature and Land Sciences (DIPNET) of the University of Sassari is a melting pot of different disciplines that share the same experimental and modelistic approach to Natural Sciences. Their scientific activity is characterized by the interaction and collaboration between research groups with different skills. For instance, this interdisciplinary approach allows DIPNET researchers to incorporate socio-economic issues when studying the structure and functions of ecosystems, and to propose better solutions to solve environmental problems.

Tenured researcher Emmanuele Farris (emfa@uniss.it) carries out a large part of his research on semi-natural Mediterranean habitats linked to pastoral activities, studying the effects of land use change on plant biodiversity at species and community levels. He strongly believes that human activities are a structural and functional pillar of Mediterranean agro-silvo-pastoral systems, intended as complex socio-ecological systems.

Latvia

Latvian Fund for Nature

The Latvian Fund for Nature (LFN) is a non-profit organisation engaged in practical activities to preserve the environment and to educate society about the importance of biological diversity. To achieve its mission, LFN has established five long-term programmes: Nature conservation policy, Educating society about nature, Biological diversity and ecosystems, Protected species and habitats, and Specially protected nature areas. You can follow LFN on twitter and see their videos on vimeo.

Andrejs Briedis (andrejs.briedis@ldf.lv), Responsible for rural issues at LFN, believes that cooperation with EFNCP brings new ideas, knowledge and experience to their work towards preserving rural biodiversity: As Latvia has not yet mapped High Nature Value (HNV) farming areas, it is especially important for us to learn how other European countries have done it and how this is used when designing the agri-environmental measures targeting biodiversity.

Lithuania

Baltic Environmental Forum Lithuania

The Baltic Environmental Forum Lithuania (BEF) is a non-governmental organization working with a broad range of environmental topics but mainly focusing on biodiversity conservation, agriculture and rural development, consumer education and management of chemicals. While showing much attention to the local living style, it also helps locals to understand that nature conservation can be a driver for a sustainable growth of the economy. You can read more about the work of the organisation in the annual activity reports or by screening activities by topic. Follow BEF on Facebook, Youtube, Vimeo and Issuu.

We are trying to bring people closer to nature by making it understandable, memorable and providing opportunities to really feel and see the value of it, says Zymantas Morkvenas, director of BEF. In Lithuania, BEF is a member of the Lithuanian Environmental Coalition, and of the smallholder farmers’ and responsible consumers’ association “Viva Sol”. We are keen to revive pastoralism in our country and we see EFNCP as a great platform for larger cooperation.

The Lithuanian Fund for Nature

The Lithuanian Fund for Nature (LGF) is a non-governmental organization whose activities are closely related to the preservation of wildlife, restoration of habitats and environmental education. Founded in 1991, right after the reestablishment of independence after the collapse of the Soviet Union, the LFN is one of the first conservation organizations in Lithuania. You can follow LGF on facebook and see their videos on youtube.

Nerijus Zableckis (nerijus.z@glis.lt), Project Manager at LGF, points out that agricultural areas are an unavoidable part of our landscapes: They can either be high nature value areas if farmed in sustainable ways, or pollute entire ecosystems, like the Baltic sea, if managed without environmental concerns. Therefore, LFN focuses on highlighting good farming practices, supporting extensive grazing, and influencing the political arena, among other activities. Farmers are our friends, not enemies…

Macedonia

The Macedonian Ecological Society (MES) in an environmental NGO that accomplishes its goals through the implementation of projects as well as the organization of scientific and professional gatherings. MES publishes scientific and dissemination material in the field of ecology and nature conservation, and provides training to its membership and young scientists, with the aim of assisting in the creation of a pool of young professionals which will take on future challenges in the fields of ecology and nature conservation. You can follow MES activities on facebook and twitter.

So far, MES has collaborated with EFNCP in meetings, workshops and conferences in Macedonia and neighbouring countries, where participants could exchange their knowledge in the domain of HNV farming, but we should extend our cooperation, says Aleksandra Todorovska (todorovska@mes.org.mk), MES Project Manager. MES is an organization which is especially focused on protection of nature, and we understand that this is closely related to rural development, extensive livestock breeding and the traditional agricultural practices contributing to conservation of biodiversity, as we find in some rural regions in Macedonia.

Netherlands

Dutch Butterfly Conservation

The chief aims of Dutch Butterfly Conservation (website, facebook, twitter, youtube) are the conservation and restoration of the Dutch butterfly, dragonfly and moth fauna.They carry out research and dissemination activities and provide advice to land managers and decision makers. They have a network of more than 1500 volunteers, some 6000 donors, and collaborate closely with other national and international organisations.

Chris van Swaay (chris.vanswaay@vlinderstichting.nl) regrets that there is hardly any High Nature Value farmland left in the Netherlands: Agricultural intensification has led to a significant decline in the abundance of butterflies and moths, which are excellent indicators of the quality of the nature and landscape. However, beyond our work in the Netherlands, we like to support HNV farming in European peripheral countries through EFNCP and our sister organisation Butterfly Conservation Europe.

Norway

Norsk seterkultur

The Norwegian Transhumance and Pastoralism Association (Norsk seterkultur) is an NGO that supports summer pasture farming. Established in 1999, this association has some 500 members, including active mountain farmers and other stakeholders. In 2014, there were still 15-20,000 goats and 35-40,000 cows which were milked in summer farms, producing the Norwegian specialities, brown cheese or whey cheese. Norsk seterkultur is working to have a specific Seter (“summer farm”) brand for these cheeses. You may read more about them on their website and their facebook page.

The practice of summer grazing is almost as old as farming in Norway, and is the epitome of an agricultural system based on grazing livestock, says Norsk seterkultur spokeswoman Katharina Sparstad (katharina.sparstad@valdres.no). These unique systems are an excellent example of a high quality livestock product being linked to a high nature value farmed landscape - the type of agriculture that EFNCP strives to protect across Europe.

Romania

Fundatia ADEPT-Transilvania (website, facebook, twitter) has been working since 2002 to protect the nature-rich, farmed landscapes of Transylvania, which are possibly the most extensive working High Nature Value Farmed landscape in lowland Europe. ADEPT works in partnership with farmers, local communities, universities, other NGOs, and government at all levels in order to solve the range of problems threatening the survival of the small-scale farming communities who have created this remarkable landscape over centuries and who maintain it today.

ADEPT and EFNCP started collaborating in 2009 and jointly organised the High Nature Value grasslands conference in Sibiu in 2010, attended by agri-environment specialists and farmers from 15 countries and representatives of the European Commission. EFNCP has been key to recognising the European significance of Romanian HNV farmed landscapes, helped ADEPT make strategies towards HNV in Romania, and they continue to cooperate on Romanian policy and HNV indicators, asserts ADEPT Director Nat Page (nat@fundatia-adept.org). ADEPT and EFNCP are the leaders of the only two DG Environment-funded pilot projects for results-based agri-environment schemes.

Serbia

ORCA

Organisation for Respect and Care of Animals (ORCA, facebook, youtube) is a non-profit civil society organisation working for 16 years on the improvement of policy, legislation and practice related to animal welfare, rural development and environmental protection in Serbia and the Western Balkans region, through research, education, advocacy and monitoring. ORCA facilitates the development of sustainable society where people are responsible, informed and active members of community and respect animals, nature and each other.

As a leader of a regional network of CSOs, public institutions and scientists working for sustainable agriculture in the Western Balkans region, says ORCA board member Jelena Burazerovic (jelena.burazerovic@orca.rs), we fully appreciate membership in EFNCP to exchange knowledge and information about designing agri-environmental measures targeting nature protection, especially having in mind the region's EU accession intensive processes.

Spain

The Asociación de Ganaderos Trashumantes de Asturias (AGTA) is an organisation of short distance transhumant pastoralists from Asturias (Northern Spain). Many of them make an extensive use of common pastures in the mountains during the summer. AGTA supports the traditional grazing systems that have forged valuable silvopastoral agro-ecosystems in the region. In this regard, they make proposals and liaise with the government, design and coordinate projects, and help pastoralists overcome all sorts of issues related to their activity (legal requirements, marketing, etc.)

AGTA President Xuan Valladares (ja.valladaresalvarez@gmail.com) believes there is a natural convergence and understanding with EFNCP, as we all support the high nature, landscape and cultural value of extensive livestock farming practices. Besides, partnering with EFNCP helps us reach our goals, as it gives us the opportunity to share our knowledge and proposals at the European level, which should eventually lead to the relevant institutions making better decisions for pastoralists.


The Asociación Pastores por el Monte Mediterráneo (APMM) was created in 2009 in Andalucía to raise awareness and give better support to extensive livestock farming systems. In this Spanish region, over 200 graziers (many of them members of this association) are currently collaborating in the wildfire prevention programme by grazing their livestock in fuelbreaks strategically located in forest areas.

We started to collaborate with the EFNCP in 2012, with a joint work programme that included educational activities with schoolchildren, ecotourism proposals, a seminar and, most notably, a report on Extensive Livestock Systems and CAP in Andalucia. We have few resources, but we do our best to take part in projects and activities that contribute to a better future for our graziers and the multifunctional landscape they preserve, says Rogelio Jiménez (info@pastoresmonte.org), chair of APMM.


Entretantos is a non-profit organization created by a cluster of professionals and entrepreneurs aimed to improve and enhance participation in projects, plans or public policies related to land management, sustainability and environmental issues. Among other projects, Entretantos (@entre_tantos) holds the secretariat of the Spanish Platform for Extensive Livestock Systems and Pastoralism, a network of over 200 people and organisations (livestock farmers, conservationists, researchers, government officers, farm advisors and many other third-sector actors and stakeholders) committed to collaborating and developing innovative projects useful to support this farming activity. You can get to know this Plataforma better on their website, facebook and twitter.

Entretantos shares goals and vision with EFNCP. Thus, we collaborate with them in a wide range of actions, including field studies, research and communication programs on pastoralism. We are both sure participation is an essential tool to improve mutual knowledge and cooperation among stakeholders, says Programme Coordinator Pedro M. Herrera (gestion@entretantos.org).


QueRed, the “Spanish Network of Farmhouse and Artisan Cheese Makers” (Red Española de Queserías de Campo y Artesanas), is a non-profit association created mainly by farmers who process their own milk, in collaboration with other stakeholders such as scientists, administrations, technical centers and further experts. Their objective is to defend and promote the status of small-scale cheese dairies and their main priority is to work for the improvement and adaptation of regional, national and European regulations to their reality. Inadequate regulations and their poor interpretation are main limitations for scaling-up these micro-enterprises, which are crucial for the development of rural areas and the maintenance of HNV farming systems, asserts Remedios Carrasco (redqueserias@redqueserias.org), coordinator of QueRed.

Thanks to a collaboration with the EFNCP, in 2015 QueRed is giving support to future cheesemakers, organising tasting sessions of “endangered” cheeses, informing about regulations and, most importantly, working for the approval of two national proposals that are key for the future of small-scale cheese dairies in Spain. You will find more information about QueRed on their website, facebook and twitter.

Sweden

Constituted in 1982, the National Association for the Swedish Archipelago (Skärgårdarnas Riksförbund, SRF), is an NGO working on employment, housing and services for people living in the Swedish archipelagos. There are thousands of small islands in Sweden; about 500 of them inhabited and 100 are farmed, producing unique High Nature Value mosaic landscapes on rocky islands with shore meadows, pastures and forests. Small scale island farming has many natural constraints (fragmentation, transport by boat, etc.) and numerous difficulties to fit in agriculture support schemes.



SRF supports a network of island farmers with information and possibilities to exchange experiences, says Anna-Karin Utbult Almkvist, SRF Agriculture coordinator. We also inform politicians and authorities on the situation for island farmers and advocate a better recognition in agricultural policies of the environmental services provided by island farmers. We think that being a member of the EFNCP is a valuable and inspiring way to exchange and collaborate across Europe, and together we can influence the CAP to give more attention to High Nature Value farming.


The Swedish Association for Transhumance and Pastoralism (Föreningen Sveriges Fäbodbrukare) is a non-profit professional organisation for the country's approximately 200 remaining farmers still practising the traditional free-range grazing system. These systems are mainly found in the counties of Dalarna, Jämtland, Gävleborg and Värmland, and also all through the boreal areas to the border of Finland. The association, which was formed in 2004, represents the common pasture movement in the country and works on the broader questions of small farms and semi-natural pasturing in forests and mountains.



Board member Pauline Palmcrantz (pauline@fabod.nu) considers that being part of the EFNCP is essential for the practitioners of transhumance in boreal and mountainous Sweden, as it enables us to identify ourselves as HNV farmers in Europe. This concept, which helps identify how important grazing practices are for conservation, is not (yet) on our national government´s agenda nor sufficiently recognised by the Swedish conservationist community.


The Swedish Society for Nature Conservation (SSNC) has been Sweden’s most influential environmental organisation for decades and currently has around 221,000 members They aim to spread knowledge, chart environmental threats, propose solutions and influence politicians and authorities, both nationally and internationally. Climate change, seas and fishing, forests, agriculture and environmental toxins are their priority areas of work. You can follow their activities on facebook and twitter, and see their videos on youtube.

In 2007 SSNC and EFNCP organised a joint conference in Uppsala on the theme Can the Market Work for Nature? and since then we have collaborated closely on policy work around the issue of permanent pastures and the CAP including events in Brussels and publications. SSNC wants to preserve, protect and develop cultivated landscapes with rich natural and historical attributes, affirms Agriculture Officer Emelie Hansson (emelie.hansson@naturskyddsforeningen.se), we therefore influence politicians and authorities to make it possible to have active farming with grazing animals throughout all of Sweden. A rich cultivated landscape is a priority in Sweden and can only be met with sustainable farming methods and extensive animal production with grazing animals.

United Kingdom

Butterfly Conservation (website, facebook, twitter) was formed by a small group of dedicated naturalists in 1968, following the alarming decline of many beautiful butterflies. Indeed, four butterflies and over 60 moths became extinct last century in the UK, and Butterfly Conservation aims to halt this process and conserve a world rich in butterflies and moths for future generations to enjoy. Butterfly Conservation has more than 26,000 members in the UK, 32 volunteer Branches throughout the British Isles and more than 60 staff. It manages more than 30 nature reserves and leads or is heavily involved in 70 landscape-scale projects to conserve habitats and their associated species.

BC Scotland Director Paul Kirkland (pkirkland@butterfly-conservation.org) says that the UK, and Scotland in particular, has a very large extent of HNV farmland, recognised as such by the tireless work over the years by the EFNCP: We find much in the work of EFNCP to agree with and support, particularly the promotion of low intensity, small scale agriculture and forestry as ecologically sustainable and wildlife-friendly ways of managing land, and the flagging up the biodiversity value of habitat mosaics. We feel that butterflies especially are a very useful group in terms of using species to help identify and monitor the quality of HNV.


The Chillingham Wild Cattle Association (website, facebook, twitter) is a registered charity, founded in 1939 to conserve and protect the unique free-ranging cattle that live in Chillingham Park, one of the most beautiful sites of northern England. Historically the Park is a medieval wood pasture converted at some time before 1700 into a landscape park by the owners of Chillingham Castle. The Association employs a Warden, who takes visitors on walking tours to see the cattle.

Stephen J.G. Hall (sthall@lincoln.ac.uk) vice-chairman of the Association, is Emeritus Professor of Animal Science at the University of Lincoln, UK, and has research interests in the cattle and the landscape ecology of Chillingham Park. Grazing contributes to making the Park a highly diverse wood pasture, with many flowers, magnificent trees over 250 years old and varied wildlife. Membership of EFNCP has been very helpful in giving access to La Cañada, which has provided literature references for some of our scientific publications.


The National Trust (website, facebook, twitter, youtube) is a charity founded in 1895 to protect the cultural and national heritage and open spaces in England, Wales and Northern Ireland. It currently manages 1300 km of coastline, over 250,000 ha of land and over 350 historic houses, gardens and parks, ancient monuments and nature reserves. For the Trust, conservation has always gone hand-in-hand with public access, so it restores these special places, protects them and opens them up for everyone to enjoy.

Head of NT Nature Conservation David Bullock (david.bullock@nationaltrust.org.uk) has long been involved with the EFNCP. Some of the habitats we are actively managing and recreating, like coastal and floodplain grazing marsh, require extensive grazing to realise the full potential of ecosystem functioning. But large herbivores are not just a management tool: they are an integral part of the ecosystems. In this regard, we are keen to explore in depth the relationship between High Nature Value farming and Rewilding initiatives.


The North Pennines Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty Partnership (website, facebook, twitter, youtube) is the organisation responsible for coordinating efforts to conserve and enhance the natural and cultural heritage of the North Pennines, located in Northern England. The Partnership is made up of 25 statutory agencies, local authorities and voluntary or community organisations.

From our perspective, the EFNCP plays a number of important roles, says Rebecca Barrett (rebecca@northpenninesaonb.org.uk), Biodiversity Lead at the North Pennines AONB Partnership. Through the Forum we are able to draw on expertise and experience gathered from across Europe which is relevant to our important grassland habitats at both practical and policy levels. Initiatives developed with other Forum members have enabled us to collaborate and present common issues at an EU level. And the direct engagement of Forum staff in HNV farming issues within the North Pennines and wider northern upland chain has extended our zone of influence much further than we would be able to achieve alone. We look forward to further collaboration in the coming months and years.


The Open Spaces Society (OSS) was founded in 1865 as the Commons Preservation Society, Britain’s oldest national conservation body. Over the last 150 years this Society has preserved commons for the enjoyment of the public, and it has also been active in protecting the historical and vital rights-of-way network through England and Wales. This is done in close cooperation with the more than 2000 members interested in protecting their local common land, town and village greens, open spaces and public paths. The OSS also advises the Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs and National Assembly for Wales and campaigns for changes in legislation and more investment to protect paths and spaces.

Kate Ashbrook (hq@oss.org.uk), General Secretary at OSS, is also involved with the International Association for the Study of the Commons (IASC): Even if the work of OSS is mostly related to the ancient rights which exist in the commons and their public use for refreshment and recreation, rather than farming, we do share an interest with EFNCP for their conservation. At the IASC we are trying to bring academics and practitioners closer so that they work together to the mutual benefit, and the EFNCP could contribute to this objective in Europe. You can follow the activities of the Open Spaces Society on facebook and twitter.

Other EFNCP Members

Austria

Umweltorganisation WWF International: Danube Carpathian Programme
88a/3/9 Mariahilfer Strasse
A-1070 Vienna
Austria
Web: www.panda.org

Bulgaria

WWF Danube-Carpathian Programme Office (DCPO), Bulgaria
67 Tzanko Tzerkovski Street
1421 Sofia
Bulgaria

Croatia

Ecologica
Vlaska 64
10000 Zagreb
Croatia
Web: www.ecologica.hr

Estonia

Pärandkoosluste Kaitse Ühing (PKÜ, Estonian Seminatural Community Conservation Association
Riia 181
51014 Tartu
Estonia
Web: www.pky.ee

France

Chambre Regionale d'Agriculture Languedoc Roussillon
CS 30012
34875 Lattes
France
Web: www.languedocroussillon.chambagri.fr

Germany

Weideverein TAURUS e.V.
c/o Klaus Erber
Bergblick 3
35043 Marburg
Germany
Web: www.weideprojekte-hessen.de

Hungary

Bihar Public Foundation
Kálló-Háti Tanya 15
4177 Fõldes
Hungary
Web: -
Kiskunsági Természetvédelmi Nonprofit Zrt.
Géptelep 42
2345 Apaj
Hungary
Web: www.szomordezso.eu
Tiszatáj Kõrnyezet-és Természetvédelmi Kõzalapítvány
Rákóczi 14
4450 Tiszalõk
Hungary
Web: www.tiszataj.extra.hu
WWF Magyarország Alapitvány
Németvölgyi út 78/b
H-1124 Budapest
Hungary
Web: www.wwf.hu
Zõld Folyosó Kõzalapítvány
Kossuth u. 62
8708 Somogyfajsz
Hungary
Web: www.teraholnapert.hu

Ireland

Developing the West Together
Derrybrien
By Gort
County Galway
Ireland
Web: -

Isle of Man

Manx Chough Project
Lyndale
Derby Road
Peel
IM5 1HH
Isle of Man

Italy

Fao-Ciheam Sub-network on Mediterranean Forage Resources
CNT - ISPAAM
Traversa La Crucca, 3
7100 Sassari
Italy
Web: www.ispaam.cnr.it

Lithuania

Baltic Environmental Forum
Uzupio str. 9/2-17
LT-01202 Vilnius
Lithuania
Web: bef.lt

Portugal

Liga para a proteccao da natureza
Estrada do Calhariz de Benfica, n. 187
1500-124 Lisboa
Portugal
Web: www.lpn.pt

Romania

Asociattia Microregionala Pogány-havas
Strada Szék 123
Miercurea Ciuc
530203 Romania
Web: poganyhavas.ro
WWF Danube-Carpathian Programme Office (DCPO), Romania
Mircea Vulcanescu Street No. 109 Sector 1
Bucharest, RO-010818
Romania

Slovakia

DAPHNE - Institute of Applied Ecology
Podunajská 24
82106 Bratislava
Slovakia
Web: www.daphne.sk

Spain

ASOCIACIÓN CULTURAL PASTORIL ARKIDE
Gomiztegi Baserria – Arantzazu auzoa
20567 Oñati
Gipuzkoa (Basque Country)
Spain
Web: -
Asociación de Ganaderos Alto Águeda
Calle Oeste 31
37541 Casillas de Flores
Spain
Web: -
Instituto de Desarrollo Rural Sostenible
Finca Cebrea
10430 Cuacos de Yuste (Caceres)
Spain
Web: -
Trashumancia y Naturaleza
Bº Tresano 36
39500 Cabezón de la Sal
Spain
Web: www.pastos.es

Sweden

Världsnaturfonden WWF
Ulriksdals Slott
S-17081 Solna
Sweden
Web: www.wwf.se

Switzerland

Bureau Natcons
Steinengraben 2
4051 Basel
Switzerland
Web: -
Ornithologische Gesellschaft Basel
Steinengraben 2
4051 Basel
Switzerland
Web: www.ogbasel.ch

United Kingdom

Fieldfare International Ecological Development plc
36 Kingfisher Court
Hambridge Road
Newbury
RG14 5SJ
United Kingdom
Web: www.fieldfare.biz
Forest of Bowland AONB
Kettledrum, 6 Root Hill Estate Yard, Whitewell Rd
BB7 3AY Dunsop Bridge
United Kingdom
Web: forestofbowland.com
Grazing Advice Partnership
Rare Breeds Survival Trust Ltd.
Stoneleigh Park
Near Kenilworth
Warwickshire
CV8 2LG
United Kingdom
Web: www.grazinganimalsproject.org.uk
Highland Foundation for Wildlife
c/o R & R. Urquhart, Solicitors,
117-121 High Street
Forres
Moray
IV36 1AB
United Kingdom
Web: www.roydennis.org
International Institute for Environment and Development
3 Endsleigh Street
London
WC1H 0DD
United Kingdom
Web: www.iied.org
Scottish Crofting Foundation
Lochalsh Business Park
Auchtertyre
Kyle of Lochalsh
IV40 8EG
United Kingdom
Web: www.crofting.org
South West Uplands Federation
c/o Bradleigh, Aboveway
Exminster
EX6 8DT
United Kingdom
Web: swuf.org.uk
The Borders Foundation for Rural Sustainability
c/o J&H Mitchell WS
51 Atholl Road
Pitlochry
PH16 5BU
United Kingdom
Web: www.bfrs.org.uk

 
Logo Printversion EFNCP
European Forum on Nature Conservation and Pastoralism
Online: http://www.efncp.org/members/
Date: 2017/11/24
© 2017 EFNCP – All rights reserved.